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E. coli: What You Need to Know

About E. coli

Escherichia coli, which is normally found in the digestive system of healthy people and animals, can be benign--causing only mild diarrhea. However, sometimes it can lead to severe stomach cramps and bloody diarrhea.

If you are among the few who get infected with E. coli O157:H7, you will likely recover from mild symptoms within a week but some individuals may face life-threatening complications.
 

Symptoms

After being exposed to the bacteria, symptoms of an E. coli infection usually emerge three or four days afterward but sometimes as soon as one day following exposure. Symptoms are:
  • Diarrhea, which may range from mild and watery to severe and bloody
  • Stomach cramping, pain, or tenderness
  • Nausea and vomiting, in some people

When to see a doctor

If you have persistent, severe, or bloody diarrhea, contact your doctor.
 

Causes

Not all E. coli strains cause diarrhea, but one strain called E. coli O157:H7 can produce a powerful toxin that damages the lining of the small intestine, resulting in bloody diarrhea. You can become infected with this bacteria by ingesting it or having contact with fecal matter from an animal carrying the infection.

Unlike many other bacterial pathogens, E. coli can cause an infection even if you ingest only a small amount. Because of this, and unlike many other bacterial pathogens, one could be sickened by ingesting a slightly undercooked hamburger or swallowing a mouthful of contaminated pool water with enough  E. coli bacteria to make them sick. Possible causes of exposure are contaminated food or water and person-to-person contact.
 

Contaminated food

One of the most common ways to contract E. coli is by consuming contaminated food, such as:
  • Ground beef. When cattle are slaughtered and processed, E. coli bacteria in their intestines can get on the meat. Ground beef combines meat from many different animals, increasing the risk of contamination.
  • Unpasteurized milk. E. coli bacteria on a cow's udder or on milking equipment can get into raw milk.
  • Fresh produce. Runoff from cattle farms can contaminate fields where fresh produce is grown. Certain vegetables, such as spinach and lettuce, are particularly vulnerable to this type of contamination.

Contaminated water

Human and animal stool can contaminate groundwater, as well as streams, rivers, lakes, which include the water used to irrigate crops. Even when public water systems use different disinfection methods (chlorine, UV, ozone)it is possible for outbreaks to occur if an area's municipal water supply is contaminated with E. coli.
One more concern for rural people is the integrity of their water supply. Many wells do not have a way to disinfect water, and it is easier for such supplies to become contaminated with pathogens than other sources because they are more difficult to monitor. This has been true in some recent instances where E. coli was present after swimming pools or lakes were polluted by stool.
 

Personal contact

E. coli bacteria can easily spread from person to person, and the infection is especially likely for family members of young children who are infected with E. coli. Outbreaks of E.coli have occurred among kids visiting petting zoos or at county fairs in animal barns.
 

Risk factors

Bacteria can affect a variety of people. However, some are more susceptible to infection than others. Factors that increase the chance that you will have issues with bacteria include:
  • Age. Young children and older adults are at higher risk of experiencing illness caused by E. coli and more serious complications from the infection.
  • Weakened immune systems. People who have weakened immune systems — from AIDS or from drugs to treat cancer or prevent the rejection of organ transplants — are more likely to become ill from ingesting E. coli.
  • Eating certain types of food. Riskier foods include undercooked hamburgers; unpasteurized milk, apple juice, or cider; and soft cheeses made from raw milk.
  • Time of year. Though it's not clear why the majority of E. coli infections in the U.S. occur from June through September.
  • Decreased stomach acid levels. Stomach acid offers some protection against E. coli. If you take medications to reduce stomach acid, such as esomeprazole (Nexium), pantoprazole (Protonix), lansoprazole (Prevacid), and omeprazole (Prilosec), you may increase your risk of an E. coli infection.
 

Complications

Most healthy adults with E. coli illness will recover in a week. In more serious cases, especially young children and the elderly, there is a risk of developing a life-threatening kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome.
 

Prevention

At the moment, there are no vaccines to protect against E. coli-based illnesses, but researchers are investigating potential vaccines that may provide more protection in the future. To reduce your chances of being exposed to any type of E. coli, avoid swallowing water from lakes or pools, wash your hands often, stay away from risky foods as well as look out for potential cross-contamination.
 

Risky foods

  • Cook hamburgers until they're 160 °F (71 °C). Hamburgers should be well-done, with no pink showing. But color isn't a good guide to know if the meat is done cooking. Meat — especially if grilled — can brown before it's completely cooked. Use a meat thermometer to ensure that meat is heated to at least 160 °F (71 °C) at its thickest point.
  • Drink pasteurized milk, juice, and cider. Any boxed or bottled juice kept at room temperature is likely to be pasteurized, even if the label doesn't say so. Avoid any unpasteurized dairy products or juice.
  • Wash raw produce thoroughly. Washing produce may not get rid of all E. coli — especially in leafy greens, which provide many places for the bacteria to attach themselves to. Careful rinsing can remove dirt and reduce the amount of bacteria that may be clinging to the produce.
 

Avoid cross-contamination

  • Wash utensils. Use hot soapy water on knives, countertops, and cutting boards before and after they come into contact with fresh produce or raw meat.
  • Keep raw foods separate. This includes using separate cutting boards for raw meat and foods, such as vegetables and fruits. Never put cooked hamburgers on the same plate you used for raw patties.
  • Wash your hands. Wash your hands after preparing or eating food, using the bathroom, or changing diapers. Make sure that children also wash their hands before eating, after using the bathroom, and after contact with animals.
Read more

Recent E. coli Reports

Chicken bowl landed me in the hospital with ecoli! I’ve never been so sick in my life. Had to call the ambulance and hospital stay for a couple of days. | Symptoms: Nausea, Diarrhea, Vomiting See Less
8.8K


TK
t.......4
Years ago I got sick more than once from eating Chipotle chicken bowls and at the one on Crenshaw Blvd. in Torrance. I'll never eat there again.
Reply 18 hours ago
Experience chills diarrhea nausea for three days in the Dominican Republic Santo Domingo area went to a few restaurants try to be careful but that didn’t help doctor diagnosed me back in USA with E. coli Gastrointestinal and put me on antibiotics.. This is the third time... See More I have been in different parts of the country I have come back sick | Symptoms: Nausea, Diarrhea, Chills See Less
22


Rappel Conso announced the recall of La Grange Reblochon Fermier AOP cheese due to possible E. coli STEC contamination. This product was sold by Grand Frais Fresh nationwide in France.

The recalled product is La Grange Reblochon Fermier AOP, GTIN 2481206000007, All lots with Best before date... See More 09/30/2022.

Brand: La Grange
Marketing date: 08/26/2022
Marketing end date: 09/09/2022
Storage temperature: Product to be stored in refrigerator.
Distributor: Grand Frais Fresh
Publication date: 09/13/2022
Health mark: FR-74-160-166-CE
Reason for recall: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)
End date of the recall process: 09/23/2022

If you have the recalled product in your home, please do not eat it, throw it away or return it to the place of purchase for a refund.

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: rappel.conso.gouv.fr
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8


CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the USDA-FSIS are investigating a multistate E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to ground beef in HelloFresh meal kits. As of September 12, 2022, seven people have been reported from 6 states (MD, NJ, NY, PA, VA and... See More WA). Six people have been hospitalized and none have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a serious condition that can cause kidney failure. No deaths have been reported. Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 8, 2022, to August 17, 2022

The meal kits, which may include contaminated ground beef, were shipped to consumers from July 2 to July 21, 2022. It was packed in 10-oz. plastic vacuum-packed packages inside a variety of HelloFresh meal kits. The beef was labeled “GROUND BEEF 85% LEAN/15% FAT". Packages have “EST.46841” inside the USDA inspection mark and “EST#46841 L1 22 155” or “EST#46841 L5 22 155” on the side of the packaging.

CDC is advising people to check their freezer if they froze any of the ground beef in HelloFresh meal kits matching the description above. If you have it in your home please do not eat it, and throw it away.

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: cdc.gov
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465


Friday 09/09/2022, Romaine Lettuce purchased at this place. Diagnosed E. Coli in emergency room | Symptoms: Diarrhea, Nausea, Vomiting See Less
174


The FSIS is issuing a public health alert for ground beef products in HelloFresh meal kits due to concerns that they may be associated with Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 illness. A recall was not requested because the products are no longer available for purchase.

The affected... See More product is:
- 10-oz. plastic vacuum-packed packages containing “GROUND BEEF 85% LEAN/15% FAT” with codes “EST#46841 L1 22 155” or “EST#46841 L5 22 155” on the side of the packaging. The packages bear “EST.46841” inside the USDA mark of inspection and on the plastic ground beef package.

The affected meal kits containing ground beef were shipped to consumers from July 2-21, 2022.

FSIS, the CDC and state public health partners are investigating an outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 and raw ground beef is the probable source of the reported illnesses. Traceback information identified that multiple case-patients received ground beef produced at establishment M46841 and distributed by HelloFresh in meal kits from July 2-21, 2022. Traceback of materials used to produce the ground beef is ongoing and FSIS continues to work with suppliers and public health partners on the investigation.

FSIS is concerned that some products may be in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away.

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: fsis.usda.gov
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464


W8
anonymous6897
More like Fresh From Hell 😂
3 Reply 2 weeks ago
WQ
anonymous6952
right lol. i dont trust shit no more. they want us all poisoned and dead
Reply 1 week ago
SDSU’s Environmental Health and Safety team is working closely with the County of San Diego Health & Human Services Agency to investigate an E. coli (STEC) outbreak at San Diego State University. On Sept. 6, Student Health Services notified the SDSU community of 2 cases of Shiga... See More Toxin-Producing E. coli (STEC) in the student community in 1 residential and 1 non-residential student. These students began experiencing symptoms on Aug. 27 and 29, respectively. At this time, a specific food source has not been identified for either of these cases.

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: sacd.sdsu.edu
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2.4K


Bonvallis brand Nevat (cheese) recalled due to generic E. coli. The recalled product was sold in Quebec.

-Affected products:
Brand: Bonvallis, Product: Nevat (cheese), Size: Approx. 2.4 kg, Codes: Batch: 32062022 ; Best before: 18/11/2022, UPC: None

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as... See More watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Company name: Les Fromageries Pimar Inc.
Brand name: Bonvallis
Product recalled: Nevat (cheese)
Reason of the recall: Issue Food - Microbial Contamination - E. Coli - non-pathogenic
CFIA Recall date: 2022-09-08

Source: recalls-rappels.canada.ca
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39


August 28, 2022, Lack of food preparation safety and cleanliness I have had diarrhea for less 12 days lost 12 pounds I’m getting ready to start on the antibiotics Prescribed by my doctor, I was diagnosed with E. coli | Symptoms: Diarrhea See Less
Occidental Cozumel, San Miguel de Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico photo #1 Occidental Cozumel, San Miguel de Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico photo #1
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Occidental Cozumel, San Miguel de Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico photo #2
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Occidental Cozumel, San Miguel de Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico photo #3
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Occidental Cozumel, San Miguel de Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico photo #4 Occidental Cozumel, San Miguel de Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico photo #5 Occidental Cozumel, San Miguel de Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico photo #6 Occidental Cozumel, San Miguel de Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico photo #7
68


Public health authorities are investigating an increase of cases of a potentially-deadly bacteria Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) in the midwest region. More than 20 VTEC cases were notified in the region between July 31st-August 27th, including several hospitalizations according to Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC) provisional data.... See More

According to the news, multidisciplinary public health teams have managed and investigated outbreaks and cases in households and in rural settings, particularly on or near farms, and sites with access to a private well supply, and sources of infection are under investigation.

The VTEC strain produces a powerful toxin that can cause severe illness, particularly in children under five and the elderly. The infection can be passed from person to person, through consuming contaminated food or water or contact with infected animals or contamination in the environment. In addition to causing severe stomach pains and diarrhea, VTEC can cause a serious condition known as Haemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), which results in the breakdown of red blood cells and kidney failure. A small number of HUS cases have been confirmed.

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting, stomach cramps, and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: irishtimes.com
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