REPORT IT NOW
I am reporting:
Please select at least one of the options
Please fill in incident place
Did you also consume (in the past 7 days):
Get alerts for your case
Provide a contact email
The email field is required
Without your contact information it's not possible to follow up on your complaint. Please provide your email. Thank you 🙂
Please accept our Terms & Conditions
Protect friends & family
Provide a contact phone number
This makes it easier to follow up - especially if there is some urgency e.g. in a public health investigation. THANK YOU 👍
Add video or photo!
We Recommend video or photos of:
  1. The receipt
  2. The product
  3. The packaging
Add Photo/Video
Email or SMS a copy of report
Enter below to get emailed or SMS a copy of your report
Please provide email or phone
Please provide email or phone
Thanks for your report.
Get location based notifications
IMPORTANT

Your report is queued - it may take up to 12 hours for your report to be processed.

Please provide location
Please provide location
Please provide report title
Please provide details
Please accept our Terms & Conditions
Get alerts and updates for your case! Your contact information is not shown on the website.

This information is not shown on the website. We can notify you of updates, and may contact you for more information to help resolve or follow up on your issue.

or
Please provide email or phone
Thank you for your report!

IMPORTANT - YOUR REPORT IS QUEUED - IT MAY TAKE UP TO 12 HOURS FOR YOUR REPORT TO SHOW ON OUR HOME PAGE (IF NOT OPTED AS PRIVATE)

Visit our learn pages for more helpful information or, email us: support@iwaspoisoned.com

Goodbye! and best wishes in your recovery

United States

Updated: September 20, 2022 4:23 PM
The CDC has issued a traveler alert due to a Strain of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Newport in Mexico. They report some travelers who have spent time in Mexico have been infected with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Newport. Many travelers with MDR Salmonella Newport infections reported eating beef, cheese (including... See More queso fresco and Oaxaca), beef jerky, or dried beef (carne seca) before they got sick. This MDR Salmonella has developed the ability to defeat drugs designed to kill them. Infections with MDR Salmonella can be difficult to treat.

CDC advises people who plan to travel to Mexico to follow these recommendations to prevent Salmonella infection:
- Follow safe eating, drinking, cooking, and food handling habits to help reduce your chance of getting sick while traveling.
- Be aware that beef jerky and other dried beef products can cause illness if not prepared safely. If you don’t know whether beef jerky was prepared safely, consider not eating it.
- Handle and cook beef safely when preparing it at home.
- Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before eating, before and after touching food, and after using the toilet.

DO NOT:
- Eat beef that may be raw or undercooked.
- Eat soft cheese that might be made from raw or unpasteurized milk.
- Eat food prepared by someone who is sick or has recently been sick.
- Prepare food for others while you are sick.

In case you are experiencing Salmonella symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: wwwnc.cdc.gov
See Less
463


The McHenry County Department of Health is investigating an outbreak of a gastrointestinal illness linked to D.C. Cobb’s located at 1204 N. Green Street, McHenry, IL. They have received complaints from 13 people who became ill after eating at the establishment. MCDH is continuing its investigation into... See More the source and type of outbreak at this time.

MCDH advises those who ate at the food establishment from Aug. 29 through Sept. 13 to complete a survey to assist MCDH in collecting data to help determine the cause of this illness.

In case you are experiencing food poisoning symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: mchenrycountyil.gov
See Less
4.9K


CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the USDA-FSIS are investigating a multistate E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to ground beef in HelloFresh meal kits. As of September 12, 2022, seven people have been reported from 6 states (MD, NJ, NY, PA, VA and... See More WA). Six people have been hospitalized and none have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a serious condition that can cause kidney failure. No deaths have been reported. Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 8, 2022, to August 17, 2022

The meal kits, which may include contaminated ground beef, were shipped to consumers from July 2 to July 21, 2022. It was packed in 10-oz. plastic vacuum-packed packages inside a variety of HelloFresh meal kits. The beef was labeled “GROUND BEEF 85% LEAN/15% FAT". Packages have “EST.46841” inside the USDA inspection mark and “EST#46841 L1 22 155” or “EST#46841 L5 22 155” on the side of the packaging.

CDC is advising people to check their freezer if they froze any of the ground beef in HelloFresh meal kits matching the description above. If you have it in your home please do not eat it, and throw it away.

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: cdc.gov
See Less
465


The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes. As of September 14, 2022, a total of 6 people infected with Listeria monocytogenes have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

According to CDC, Listeriosis... See More is a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, and Listeria outbreaks are often linked to dairy products and produce. This illness is most likely to sicken pregnant women and their newborns, adults aged 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems. Other people can be infected with Listeria, but they rarely become seriously ill.

Some CDC recommendations to prevent Listeriosis:

- Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
- Don’t let juice from hot dog and lunch meat packages get on other foods, utensils, and food preparation surfaces. For people at higher risk avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats, or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving. Wash hands after handling hot dogs, lunch meats, and deli meats
- Only consume pasteurized milk and milk products, including soft cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Look for the word “pasteurized” on the label. If in doubt, don’t buy it!
- Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours.

In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: fda.gov
See Less
463


SDSU’s Environmental Health and Safety team is working closely with the County of San Diego Health & Human Services Agency to investigate an E. coli (STEC) outbreak at San Diego State University. On Sept. 6, Student Health Services notified the SDSU community of 2 cases of Shiga... See More Toxin-Producing E. coli (STEC) in the student community in 1 residential and 1 non-residential student. These students began experiencing symptoms on Aug. 27 and 29, respectively. At this time, a specific food source has not been identified for either of these cases.

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: sacd.sdsu.edu
See Less
2.4K


The MCDH is investigating an increase in Campylobacteriosis cases in McHenry County. They have identified 8 cases of Campylobacteriosis between Aug. 17 and Aug. 30, which is 4 times more cases compared to the previous two weeks and 3.33 times more cases in August compared to July.... See More No common source of infection has been identified at this time.

According to MCDH the best way to prevent a campylobacteriosis infection is to take these precautions:
- Do not drink raw (unpasteurized) milk or untreated water from lakes, rivers or ponds
- Practice good hand hygiene, especially when handling puppies or kittens with diarrhea
- Wash hands before, during and after preparing food
- Cook all raw meats to proper temperature
- Use soap and hot water to wash cutting boards, counters or utensils used to prepare raw poultry, seafood or meat to prevent cross contamination with other foods
- Avoid handling food, caring for others, patient care or daycare work if symptomatic.

In case you experience Campylobacter symptoms such as diarrhea (often bloody), fever, nausea, vomiting, and stomach cramps, report it now. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: mchenrycountyil.gov
See Less
4.9K


The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Mississippi. As of August 31, 2022, a total of 99 people infected with Salmonella Mississippi have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

Most people infected with... See More Salmonella will begin to develop symptoms 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness, salmonellosis, usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment. Most people with salmonellosis develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal.

Some FDA recommendations to prevent foodborne Illness at home:
- Clean, wash hands and surfaces often.
- Separate raw meats from other foods.
- Cook to the right temperature.
- Chill, refrigerate foods promptly.

In case you are experiencing Salmonella symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: fda.gov
See Less
463


As of August 29th, 2022, we have received 8 reports citing 29 people sick after eating at the "Best of Baltimore" event on August 18th, hosted by Baltimore Magazine, and held at the American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. The most common symptoms mentioned are diarrhea,... See More fever, and vomiting after eating at this party, one of the attendees cited receiving a medical diagnosis for Campylobacter. Some of the complainants mention having seafood from the vendors.

Some report excerpts here:

"The 2022 Best of Baltimore party, my sister and I attended. We believe the raw shrimp was not properly handled and both came down with diagnosed food poisoning."

" I got sick along with several others in my wife's company. Brutal couple of days. Still experiencing symptoms."

"Went to the Best of Baltimore event 8/18 and developed diarrhea, fatigue, stomach cramps, sweating, clammy skin. It’s 8/27 and I still have diarrhea and stomach discomfort"

The organizer, Baltimore Magazine, has sent out an email to attendees addressing the situation - excerpt here:

"Dear Best of Baltimore Party attendee:

It has come to our attention that some people who attended this year's party experienced an illness in the days after. Because we are unable to definitively identify the cause, we proactively contacted the Department of Health.

In order to conduct their investigation, the Department of Health will be sending out a survey to all event attendees to gather more information (questions are likely to inquire about recent travel, recent contact with anyone who was ill, what may have been consumed at the event, etc.)."

If you attended the Best of Baltimore event and experienced or still are experiencing food poisoning symptoms such as diarrhea, fever, and vomiting, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: https://iwaspoisoned.com
See Less
4.8K


SH
S..............e
My boyfriend and I went to this event. He got very sick and I did not. He was sick until the 28th with diarrhea, nausea, chills, fever, and fatigue. We were incredibly concerned as he couldn't eat or drink anything during this time without severe stomach pain and diarrhea. The only thing that he had that I didn't was the chicken liver pate.
2 Reply 3 weeks ago
GC
anonymous6731
Who made the pate’?
Reply 3 weeks ago
Update August 29, 2022

As of August 29, 2022, a total of 7 people infected with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) and 1 probable case have been reported in King County. 6 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. Currently, all of the cases are among... See More people from East African communities. All but one of the cases had illness onsets from June 20-August 17, 2022. One additional person was identified by WGS with an onset in December 2021. All people have recovered, or are currently recovering. The investigation into the source of these infections is still ongoing.

Source: Seattle & King County Public Health

August 23, 2022

Seattle & King County Public Health announced that they are investigating a new outbreak of 7 people infected with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) in King County. Currently, all 7 of the ill people are from East African communities. 6 of the 7 people had illness onsets from June 20-August 1, 2022. 1 additional person was identified by WGS with an onset in December 2021. 4 people have been hospitalized; this includes 3 children who developed a type of kidney complication called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). 6 people have recovered, and 1 is currently recovering.

Most of the ill people have reported eating multiple types of meat, including goat and ground beef, during their exposure period but the Public Health cannot rule out other possible sources at this time. Genetic fingerprinting results (whole genome sequencing) indicate that all 7 ill people have the same genetic strain meaning they likely have a common source of infection. At this time, this outbreak does not appear to be related to a multistate outbreak initially found in at least 4 different states CDC reported. The investigation is ongoing.

Raw meats like ground beef, goat, and lamb sometimes have germs like STEC, and have been associated with outbreaks in the past. Public Health advises following these 4 food safety steps to prevent getting sick from STEC.
- Clean: Wash your hands, utensils, and surfaces often. Rinse fruits and vegetables under running water before eating, cutting, or peeling.
- Separate: Keep food that won’t be cooked separate from raw meat, poultry, and seafood.
- Cook: Use a food thermometer to make sure you have cooked your food to a temperature high enough to kill germs.
- Chill: Refrigerate perishable food (food that goes bad) within 2 hours. If the food is exposed to temperatures above 90°F (like a hot car or picnic), refrigerate within 1 hour. Thaw food in the refrigerator, not on the counter.

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: kingcounty.gov  | Symptoms: Diarrhea, Nausea, Cramps, Bloody Stool
See Less
1.6K


Update September 1, 2022

As of August 31, 2022, a total of 97 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported to CDC from 6 states (IN, KY, MI, NY, OH and PA). 43 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported.... See More Illnesses started on dates ranging from July 26, 2022, to August 15, 2022. A specific food has not yet been confirmed as the source of this outbreak, but many sick people reported eating burgers and sandwiches with romaine lettuce at Wendy’s restaurants before getting sick. The investigation is ongoing.

Source: CDC

Update August 25, 2022

As of August 25, 2022, a total of 84 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported to CDC from 4 states (IN, MI, OH and PA). 38 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. illnesses started on dates ranging from July 26, 2022, to August 9, 2022. A specific food has not yet been confirmed as the source of this outbreak, but many sick people reported eating burgers and sandwiches with romaine lettuce at Wendy’s restaurants before getting sick. The investigation is ongoing.

Source: CDC

Update August 19, 2022

As of August 18, 2022, a total of 37 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported to CDC from 4 states (IN, MI, OH and PA). 10 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. illnesses started on dates ranging from July 26, 2022, to August 8, 2022.

A specific food has not yet been confirmed as the source of this outbreak, but many sick people reported eating sandwiches with romaine lettuce at Wendy’s restaurants in Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania before getting sick. Based on this information, Wendy’s is taking the precautionary measure of removing the romaine lettuce being used in sandwiches from restaurants in that region. Wendy’s uses a different type of romaine lettuce for salads. Investigators are working to confirm whether romaine lettuce is the source of this outbreak and whether romaine lettuce used in Wendy’s sandwiches was served or sold at other businesses. The investigation is ongoing.

Source: CDC

August 17, 2022

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, the FDA, and the USDA-FSIS are collecting different types of data to identify the food source of a multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections. So far, illnesses have only been reported from Michigan and Ohio. A single food has not yet been identified as the source and this investigation is ongoing.

Michigan and Ohio have both reported large increases in the number of E. coli infections in their states. As of August 16, 2022, a total of 29 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported to CDC from 2 states (MI and OH). 9 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. Illnesses started on dates ranging from July 26, 2022, to August 6, 2022

To prevent getting sick from E. coli, CDC advises following these 4 steps when handling or preparing food: clean, separate, cook, and chill.
- Clean: Wash your hands, utensils, and surfaces often. Rinse fruits and vegetables under running water before eating, cutting, or peeling.
- Separate: Keep food that won’t be cooked separate from raw meat, poultry, and seafood.
- Cook: Use a food thermometer to make sure you have cooked your food to a temperature high enough to kill germs.
- Chill: Refrigerate perishable food (food that goes bad) within 2 hours. If the food is exposed to temperatures above 90°F (like a hot car or picnic), refrigerate within 1 hour. Thaw food in the refrigerator, not on the counter.

In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

Source: cdc.gov
See Less
92


QJ
anonymous6554
Hell no!
Reply 1 month ago
PI
p.................n
i got it and im in texas
Reply 1 month ago
BM
anonymous6566
Thank you for sharing
Reply 1 month ago
TI
t..........a
I ate at Wendy's I live in Albuquerque New Mexico I didn't have any lettuce though I ate a baked potato it made me so sick for 2 weeks I thought I had a stomach bug until I realize the report about Wendy's I don't know if the baked potato has anything to do with it but it made me sick
-1 Reply 1 month ago
Last 30 days