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    It is possible to get food poisoning from cheese. Raw cheese soft cheeses made from unpasteurized milk can contain harmful bacteria, including E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella. Pasteurized cheese food poisoning can occur as well, mainly from contamination during processing or distribution.

    Last updated: September 20, 2022

    Product: Cheese

    The CDC has issued a traveler alert due to a Strain of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Newport in Mexico. They report some travelers who have spent time in Mexico have been infected with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Newport. Many travelers with MDR Salmonella Newport infections reported eating beef, cheese (including... See More queso fresco and Oaxaca), beef jerky, or dried beef (carne seca) before they got sick. This MDR Salmonella has developed the ability to defeat drugs designed to kill them. Infections with MDR Salmonella can be difficult to treat.

    CDC advises people who plan to travel to Mexico to follow these recommendations to prevent Salmonella infection:
    - Follow safe eating, drinking, cooking, and food handling habits to help reduce your chance of getting sick while traveling.
    - Be aware that beef jerky and other dried beef products can cause illness if not prepared safely. If you don’t know whether beef jerky was prepared safely, consider not eating it.
    - Handle and cook beef safely when preparing it at home.
    - Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before eating, before and after touching food, and after using the toilet.

    DO NOT:
    - Eat beef that may be raw or undercooked.
    - Eat soft cheese that might be made from raw or unpasteurized milk.
    - Eat food prepared by someone who is sick or has recently been sick.
    - Prepare food for others while you are sick.

    In case you are experiencing Salmonella symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: wwwnc.cdc.gov
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    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes. As of September 14, 2022, a total of 6 people infected with Listeria monocytogenes have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

    According to CDC, Listeriosis... See More is a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, and Listeria outbreaks are often linked to dairy products and produce. This illness is most likely to sicken pregnant women and their newborns, adults aged 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems. Other people can be infected with Listeria, but they rarely become seriously ill.

    Some CDC recommendations to prevent Listeriosis:

    - Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
    - Don’t let juice from hot dog and lunch meat packages get on other foods, utensils, and food preparation surfaces. For people at higher risk avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats, or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving. Wash hands after handling hot dogs, lunch meats, and deli meats
    - Only consume pasteurized milk and milk products, including soft cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Look for the word “pasteurized” on the label. If in doubt, don’t buy it!
    - Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours.

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: fda.gov
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    Northwestern Health Unit (NWHU) is investigating a foodborne illness outbreak at the Rhythm on the Range event in Dryden on August 20, 202. So far, at least 10 people reported symptoms consistent with foodborne illness. NWHU suspects that the illness is associated with macaroni and cheese sold... See More by a food vendor without a permit. The investigation is ongoing.

    Under the Health Protection and Promotion Act, anyone planning to operate a food premises must notify the local health unit before they begin operation. This requirement includes temporary food premises, such as those operated at special events and markets. Customers should look for a Temporary Event Food Vendor Permit posted at the food vendor’s location, which indicates that the premises has been inspected by NWHU.

    NWHU ask any attendees who developed symptoms within 12 hours of eating at the event and have not been contacted by NWHU are asked to call their local NWHU office.

    In case you experience vomiting, diarrhea, and nausea, report it now. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: www2.nwhu.on.ca
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    The CDC is investigating a Listeria outbreak in which most of the sick people in this outbreak live in or traveled to Florida about a month before they got sick. Up to June 30, there have been 23 people reported sick from 10 states. 22 people have... See More required hospitalization and 1 death has been reported. A specific food item has not yet been identified as the source of this outbreak.

    Among 10 people with information who did not live in Florida, 8 traveled to Florida in the month before getting sick. Listeria symptoms usually start within 2 weeks after eating food contaminated with Listeria. CDC advises that if you are at higher risk for Listeria infection and have symptoms, especially if you recently traveled to Florida, talk to your healthcare provider.

    Listeria is most likely to sicken pregnant people and their newborns, adults aged 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems. Other people can be infected with Listeria, but they rarely become seriously ill.

    Some CDC recommendations to prevent Listeriosis:

    - Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
    - Don’t let juice from hot dog and lunch meat packages get on other foods, utensils, and food preparation surfaces.
    - For people at higher risk avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats, or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving.
    - Only consume pasteurized milk and milk products, including soft cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Look for the word “pasteurized” on the label. If in doubt, don’t buy it!
    - Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours.

    In case you are experiencing Listeria symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: cdc.gov
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    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes. As of June 15, 2022, a total of 12 people infected with Listeria monocytogenes have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

    According to CDC, Listeriosis... See More is a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, and Listeria outbreaks are often linked to dairy products and produce. This illness is most likely to sicken pregnant women and their newborns, adults aged 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems. Other people can be infected with Listeria, but they rarely become seriously ill.

    Some CDC recommendations to prevent Listeriosis:

    - Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
    - Don’t let juice from hot dog and lunch meat packages get on other foods, utensils, and food preparation surfaces. For people at higher risk avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats, or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving. Wash hands after handling hot dogs, lunch meats, and deli meats
    - Only consume pasteurized milk and milk products, including soft cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Look for the word “pasteurized” on the label. If in doubt, don’t buy it!
    - Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours.

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: fda.gov
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    Ottawa Public Health is investigating along with Public Health Ontario and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency a Listeria monocytogenes outbreak linked to City View Retirement Community located at 151 Meadowlands Dr W, Nepean, ON.

    According to the news, as of noon Tuesday, June 07, 2022, there were... See More 4 confirmed cases among residents of the home, including the 2 people who have died. There are no staff cases. The source of the bacteria is still unknown.

    High-risk foods, such as raw (unpasteurized) milk, soft cheeses, raw vegetables, melons, and hot dogs, pâté, and deli meats were removed from the home's menu as of May 4, according to OPH. The investigation is ongoing.

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: cbc.ca
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    Jefferson County Public Health (JCPH), in collaboration with CDPHE, is advising the public about a potential exposure to hepatitis A at the King Soopers located at 5301 W. 38th Avenue in Wheat Ridge, CO.

    A food handler at this location has tested positive for hepatitis A, a... See More disease which could be transmitted by eating food directly handled by this employee. No other King Soopers locations are affected and employees at this location have been notified and encouraged to review their hepatitis A vaccination status.

    Consumers may be at risk of exposure if they purchased and consumed deli meats and/or cheeses sliced onsite at the deli (or consumed onsite-prepared sandwiches containing deli meats and/or cheeses) from this King Soopers location. The affected dates of purchase are March 20-30, 2022.

    JCPH is advising to who are confirmed to be at risk:
    - Assess their vaccination status for hepatitis A. Full vaccination includes two doses of the hepatitis A vaccine given 6 months apart, or three doses of the hepatitis A & hepatitis B (Twinrix) vaccine.
    - Consumers who ate onsite-prepared deli meats, cheeses and/or sandwiches within the last 14 days, and do not have been fully vaccinated against hepatitis A, should seek post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which is comprised of either vaccination against hepatitis A and/or, for certain high-risk individuals, hepatitis A immunoglobulin.

    If you are experiencing Hepatitis A symptoms like fever, jaundice, nausea, clay-colored stool, dark urine, malaise, abdominal discomfort, or vomiting, it is important to report it. It can help to detect and resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    Source: jeffco.us
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    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes. As of February 09, 2022, a total of 13 people infected with Listeria monocytogenes have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

    According to CDC, Listeriosis... See More is a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, and Listeria outbreaks are often linked to dairy products and produce.

    This illness is most likely to sicken pregnant women and their newborns, adults aged 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems. Other people can be infected with Listeria, but they rarely become seriously ill.

    Some CDC recommendations to prevent Listeriosis:

    - Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
    - Don’t let juice from hot dog and lunch meat packages get on other foods, utensils, and food preparation surfaces. For people at higher risk avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats, or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving. Wash hands after handling hot dogs, lunch meats, and deli meats
    - Only consume pasteurized milk and milk products, including soft cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Look for the word “pasteurized” on the label. If in doubt, don’t buy it!
    - Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours.

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    For more details, check the FDA outbreak investigations site: fda.gov

    Source: FDA & CDC
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    1 Share


    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes. As of December 15, 2021, a total of 16 people infected with Listeria monocytogenes have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

    According to CDC, Listeriosis... See More is a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, and Listeria outbreaks are often linked to dairy products and produce.

    This illness is most likely to sicken pregnant women and their newborns, adults aged 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems. Other people can be infected with Listeria, but they rarely become seriously ill.

    Some CDC recommendations to prevent Listeriosis:

    - Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
    - Don’t let juice from hot dog and lunch meat packages get on other foods, utensils, and food preparation surfaces. For people at higher risk avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats, or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving. Wash hands after handling hot dogs, lunch meats, and deli meats
    - Only consume pasteurized milk and milk products, including soft cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Look for the word “pasteurized” on the label. If in doubt, don’t buy it!
    - Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours.

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    For more details, check the FDA outbreak investigations site: fda.gov

    Source: FDA & CDC
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    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes. As of October 06, 2021, a total of 20 people infected with Listeria monocytogenes have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

    According to CDC, Listeriosis... See More is a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, and Listeria outbreaks are often linked to dairy products and produce.

    This illness is most likely to sicken pregnant women and their newborns, adults aged 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems. Other people can be infected with Listeria, but they rarely become seriously ill.

    Some CDC recommendations to prevent Listeriosis:

    - Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
    - Don’t let juice from hot dog and lunch meat packages get on other foods, utensils, and food preparation surfaces. For people at higher risk avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats, or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving. Wash hands after handling hot dogs, lunch meats, and deli meats
    - Only consume pasteurized milk and milk products, including soft cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Look for the word “pasteurized” on the label. If in doubt, don’t buy it!
    - Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours.

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    For more details, check the FDA outbreak investigations site: fda.gov

    Source: FDA & CDC
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