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    The most common fish food poisonings are scombroid and ciguatera. Scombroid is caused by improperly handling of fish producing histamine-releasing bacteria. Symptoms can occur as quickly as 15 mins. Ciguatera is common with tropical and sub-tropical fish and typically causes hot-cold reversal.

    Last updated: December 19, 2022

    Product: Fish

    Food Standards Scotland (FSS) and the FSA are investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes linked to specific ready-to-eat smoked fish products from Lidl. To date, the investigation has identified 15 linked cases of listeriosis since 2020, with 9 of these since January 2022. Cases have been identified... See More in England, Scotland and Wales.

    LIDL has issued a recall for products linked to this outbreak produced by St James Smokehouse and sold under Lidl’s ‘Deluxe Oak Smoked Scottish Louch Trout’ and 'Lighthouse Bay Smoked Trout Trimmings' ranges. These products are:

    - Lidl Deluxe Oak Smoked Scottish Louch Trout, 100g, All Use-By Dates between and including 20/12/2022 and 06/01/2023
    - Lighthouse Bay Smoked Trout Trimmings, 100g, All Use-By Dates between and including 20/12/2022 and 06/01/2023

    Consumers should not eat the affected products and return them to Lidl for a full refund.

    In light of this ongoing outbreak, the FSS and FSA are advising pregnant and vulnerable people to only eat ready to eat smoked fish that has been thoroughly cooked to reduce the risk of listeriosis.

    In case you are experiencing Listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: foodstandards.gov.scot
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    Scottish Slouching Trout? I wonder what genius thought that one up.
    Reply 1 month ago
    CDC is working with the FDA, the Texas Department of State Health Services, along with other state and local officials to investigate a multistate norovirus outbreak linked to raw oysters from harvest area TX 1, Galveston Bay, Texas. As of December 15, 2022, 211 norovirus illnesses have... See More been reported from 8 states (AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, TN, and TX). This number is an estimate based on the information CDC has at this time. This investigation is ongoing.

    On December 8, 2022, the Texas Department of State Health Services issued a recall on all oysters harvested between 11/17/2022 and 12/7/2022 from harvest area TX 1, Galveston Bay, Texas. They also informed the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference who notified other member states. This resulted in other states initiating recall measures consistent with the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference agreement. The FDA has confirmed that raw oysters harvested in area TX 1, Galveston Bay, Texas were potentially contaminated with norovirus and distributed to restaurants and retailers in AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, TN, and TX. It is possible that additional states received these oysters through further distribution within the U.S.

    CDC advises restaurants and food retailers should not serve raw oysters from harvest area TX 1, Galveston Bay, Texas, harvested between 11/17/2022 and 12/7/2022, which will be printed on product tags. Throw away any remaining oysters or return them to your distributor for destruction. These oysters may be contaminated with norovirus. CDC advises following these steps:

    - Wash and sanitize containers and surfaces that may have come into contact with these oysters.
    - Wash hands with warm water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process.

    Consumers are urged to not eat any of these raw oysters. If you have oysters at home from any of these areas, throw them away. Clean any utensils or food preparation surfaces that may have touched the oysters.

    Norovirus is very contagious and is easily transmitted from person to person most through the oral/fecal route. Considering that hand sanitizer does NOT work against this virus, it is important to wash your hands with soap frequently. Use bleach to clean and disinfect surfaces. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: cdc.gov
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    The Department of Fisheries and Oceans has issued an emergency closure for shellfish harvesting off Vancouver Island's west coast and are warning the public not to harvest shellfish near Barkley Sound, off Vancouver Island's west coast, due to contamination.

    According to the news, the intense rain following... See More a lengthy drought in the area has created health and safety risks, including the possibility of paralytic shellfish poisoning.

    If you have recently harvested in the area should not consume them, contaminated shellfish do not necessarily smell, taste or look different than uncontaminated shellfish, and cooking shellfish does not destroy all biotoxins.

    In case you are experiencing Paralytic shellfish poisoning symptoms such as tingling, numbness of the lips, mouth, face, arms and legs, dizziness, weakness, paralysis and respiratory failure, seek immediate medical attention. Paralytic shellfish poisoning symptoms start quickly, median time between ingestion and onset is 1 hour (between 30 minutes to 3 hours). Progression and intensity of symptoms vary with the intensity of the toxin poisoning. In severe cases, muscle paralysis, respiratory failure and death can occur within 12 hours.

    Source: cbc.ca
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    CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the FDA are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Litchfield infections linked to fresh fish sold to restaurants by Mariscos Bahia, Inc.

    The contaminated food is salmon, tuna, Chilean sea bass, swordfish, and halibut distributed from Mariscos... See More Bahia’s locations in Pico Rivera, California, and Phoenix, Arizona. The fish was distributed to restaurants in California and Arizona fresh, not frozen, and was not sold directly to consumers in grocery stores or markets.

    As of October 19, 2022, a total of 33 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Litchfield have been reported from 3 states (CA, CO, and IL), 13 people have been hospitalized and no deaths have been reported. Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 14, 2022, to September 18, 2022. The investigation is ongoing.

    According to CDC, the true number of sick people in this outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella.

    CDC is advising restaurants not to sell or serve fresh fish sold by Mariscos Bahia, Inc. Restaurants should check with their suppliers and not sell or serve salmon, tuna, Chilean sea bass, swordfish, or halibut received on or after June 14, 2022, fresh (not frozen) from Mariscos Bahia, Inc.

    In case you are experiencing Salmonella symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: cdc.gov
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    The UKHSA, Food Standards Agency and Food Standards Scotland are investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes linked to smoked fish. Whole-genome sequencing analysis has identified an outbreak of 12 linked cases of listeriosis since 2020, with 6 of these since January 2022. Cases have been identified in... See More England and Scotland. The majority of these individuals reported eating smoked fish.

    Due to the ongoing outbreak, as a precaution, information for people who are pregnant has been updated to advise that they thoroughly cook smoked fish before eating it. Advice for avoiding listeriosis infection is being updated to include smoked fish as a high-risk product which should be thoroughly cooked before being eaten by anyone in a high risk group.

    Listeria infection in most people is usually either unnoticed or may cause very mild gastrointestinal illness. However, it can have more serious consequences for some people, particularly those with pre-existing health conditions that cause weakened immunity, and people who are pregnant

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    Source food.gov.uk
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    The FDA along with the CDC, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the CFIA, and state and local partners, are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Norovirus illnesses linked to raw oysters from British Columbia, Canada. The FDA has confirmed that potentially contaminated raw oysters harvested in the... See More south and central parts of Baynes Sound, British Columbia, Canada, were distributed to restaurants and retailers in CA, CO, FL, HI, IL, MA, MN, NJ, NV, NY, OR, TX, and WA. It is possible that additional states received these oysters through further distribution within the U.S.

    Retailers should not serve raw oysters harvested from the following harvest locations (or landfiles) within Baynes Sound: #1407063, #1411206, #278737 in BC 14-8 and #1400036, in BC 14-15. “Baynes Sound” will show on product tags as “14-8”and/or “DEEP BAY”, or “14-15.”

    Consumers should not eat any raw oysters from the locations listed above. If they have any of the listed products, they should throw them in the garbage. Restaurants and retailers should not sell the potentially affected raw oysters and should dispose of any products by throwing them in the garbage or returning them to their distributor for destruction.

    Oysters can cause illness if eaten raw, particularly in people with compromised immune systems. Food contaminated with norovirus may look, smell, and taste normal. It is important to be aware that noroviruses are relatively resistant to heat. They can survive temperatures as high as 145°F. Quick steaming processes that are often used for cooking shellfish may not heat foods enough to kill noroviruses.

    Norovirus is very contagious and is easily transmitted from person to person most through the oral/fecal route. Considering that hand sanitizer does NOT work against this virus, it is important to wash your hands with soap frequently. Use bleach to clean and disinfect surfaces.

    In case you are experiencing Norovirus symptoms, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    Source: fda.gov
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    The Public Health Agency of Canada is investigatin an outbreak of norovirus and gastrointestinal illnesses linked to consumption of raw oysters from B.C. and involving four provinces: B.C. (262), Alberta (1), Saskatchewan (1), and Ontario (15).

    As of March 30, 2022, there have been 279 cases of... See More norovirus and gastrointestinal illness linked to consumption of B.C. oysters reported. Individuals became sick between mid-January and late March 2022, and no deaths have been reported. Although not all cases of illness have been tested, testing of several cases has confirmed the presence of a norovirus infection.

    Raw oysters contaminated with noroviruses may look, smell and taste normal. The following safe food-handling practices will reduce your risk of getting sick:

    - Do not eat, use, sell, or serve any recalled oysters.
    - Avoid eating raw or undercooked oysters. Cook oysters to an internal temperature of 90° Celsius (194° Fahrenheit) for a minimum of 90 seconds before eating.
    - Discard any oysters that did not open while cooking.
    - Eat oysters right away after cooking and refrigerate leftovers.
    - Always keep raw and cooked oysters separate to avoid cross-contamination.
    - Do not use the same plate or utensils for raw and cooked shellfish, and wash counters and utensils with soap and warm water after preparation.
    - Wash your hands well with soap before and after handling any food. Be sure to clean and sanitize cutting boards, counters, knives and other utensils after preparing raw foods.

    Noroviruses can be transmitted by ill individuals and are able to survive relatively high levels of chlorine and varying temperatures. Cleaning and disinfecting practices are the key to preventing further illnesses in your home.

    In case you are experiencing Norovirus symptoms such as diarrhea, stomach cramps, vomiting and nausea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    Source: canada.ca
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    Seattle & King County Public Health announced that they have received multiple reports of people getting sick with norovirus-like illness (nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea) after eating raw oysters in restaurants. In just March alone, they have received reports of 13 people whose illnesses they believe are linked... See More to eating raw oysters. An additional 14 people became sick after being in close contact with the ill people who ate oysters. Most of the additional illnesses are among family members.

    Eating raw oysters can make you sick because they can be contaminated with norovirus and other germs. While norovirus is not typically a serious illness for healthy people, it can be very unpleasant. In addition, it’s highly contagious, meaning someone who has been infected with norovirus after eating raw oysters can easily pass the virus to their family and friends.

    Some oysters linked to the illnesses reported in King County now appear to have come from a batch of oysters harvested in British Columbia, which have since been recalled due to norovirus contamination. The origin of other oysters linked to recent norovirus cases in King County is unknown at this time. Regardless of where an oyster was harvested it poses a high risk of carrying norovirus.

    Public Health advises the following to reduce the risk of norovirus:
    - Wash hands, cutting boards, and counters used for shellfish preparation immediately after use to avoid cross contaminating other foods. And, as general advice to prevent the spread of norovirus, wash hands thoroughly with soap after using the bathroom or changing diapers, and before preparing any food or eating.
    - If you’ve been sick with norovirus, wait at least 48 hours after the last episode of vomiting and/or diarrhea before preparing any food for others.
    - Oysters have long been recognized as a source of norovirus. Raw or undercooked oysters are a particular problem. Protect yourself and reduce your risk by choosing fully cooked oysters that have been thoroughly fried, baked, or made into a stew that has reached 145°F. Use a thermometer to check.
    - Avoid eating raw oysters like oyster shooters and oysters on the half shell. Adding hot sauce or lemon to oysters does not kill the virus.

    Norovirus is very contagious and is easily transmitted from person to person most through the oral/fecal route. Considering that hand sanitizer does NOT work against this virus, it is important to wash your hands with soap frequently. Use bleach to clean and disinfect surfaces.

    In case you are experiencing Norovirus symptoms, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    Source: publichealthinsider.com
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    UPDATE December 06, 2021

    CDC announced that this outbreak is over, as of December 06, 2021. To this date, a total of 115 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium were reported from 15 states (AZ, CA, CO, CT, IA, MN, MO, NE, PA, TX,... See More VA, WA, and WY). 20 were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 11, 2021, to October 16, 2021.

    Source: CDC

    October 08, 2021

    CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are collecting different types of data to investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Thompson infections. As of October 7, 2021, 102 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Thompson have been reported from 14 states (AZ, CO, CT, IA, MN, MO, NE, PA, TX, VA, WA, and WY). 19 were hospitalized and no deaths were reported.

    Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback data show that this outbreak is linked to seafood distributed by Northeast Seafood Products of Denver, Colorado. The recall was announced by FDA on October 8. These products were distributed to restaurants and grocery stores in Colorado through October 7, 2021, sold at seafood counters in Albertsons, Safeway, and Sprouts grocery stores in Colorado, and were distributed fresh but may have been frozen later by consumers and businesses.

    Seafood types of the recall include Haddock, Monkfish, Bone-in Trout, Grouper, Red Snapper, Red Rock Cod, Ocean Perch, Pacific Cod, Halibut, Coho Salmon, Atlantic Salmon Portions, Lane Snapper, Tilapia, All Natural Salmon Fillet, Pacific Sole, and Farm Raised Striped Bass.

    The majority of sick people are either Colorado residents or reported traveling to Colorado in the week before they got sick. Only two people did not report travel to Colorado in the week before they got sick. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 11, 2021, to September 7, 2021. The investigation is ongoing.

    In case you are experiencing Salmonella symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    For more outbreak details check on CDC website: cdc.gov

    Source: CDC
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    The Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) and the Rhode Island of Environmental Management (DEM) are announcing the immediate closure of the Potters Pond (GA10PP), located in South Kingstown, to all shellfish harvesting, because of an ongoing investigation into seven instances in which people became ill after... See More consuming raw shellfish between August 11th and August 19th.

    Two of these individuals tested positive for Campylobacter Jejuni. RIDOH started taking samples on the pond and one of the samples tested positive for Campylobacter lari. Even when this is a different type of Campylobacter than the one found on sick individuals, it indicates the presence of the bacteria in the pond. RIDOH is collecting additional shellfish samples for further testing. The pond will remain closed until further notice.

    RIDOH has contacted all commercial harvesters in this area to ensure that any product harvested during this time frame is not sold at restaurants and markets. RIDOH is urging recreational harvesters who harvested shellfish in Potters Pond between September 9th through September 11th to either discard the shellfish or avoid consuming them raw or undercooked.

    In case you experience Campylobacter symptoms such as diarrhea (often bloody), fever, nausea, vomiting, and stomach cramps, report it now. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance.

    For more details check on: ri.gov

    Source: RIDOH
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