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    You can get food poisoning from all types of meat. Chicken and beef are the most consumed meats and are a high risk of causing food poisoning. Meat contamination can occur during processing, manufacturing, or preparation if mishandled. Common bacteria contamination includes salmonella and E.coli.

    Last updated: November 16, 2022

    Product: Meat

    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium. As of November 16, 2022, a total of 264 people infected with Salmonella Typhimurium have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today, but the FDA is working closely with federal,... See More state, and local partners to investigate multiple food items of interest to determine the source of this outbreak.

    Some FDA recommendations to prevent foodborne Illness at home:
    - Clean, wash hands and surfaces often.
    - Separate raw meats from other foods.
    - Cook to the right temperature.
    - Chill, refrigerate foods promptly.

    In case you are experiencing Salmonella symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: fda.gov
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    The OSDH is working with Custer and Caddo County Health Departments and other local partners to investigate the cause of an increased number of cases of Campylobacter and Shiga-toxin producing E. coli. The outbreak of the Campylobacter and Shiga-toxin producing E. coli was identified Oct. 25, 2022... See More in the Hydro and Weatherford area. Since the onset of the outbreak, OSDH and the local county health departments have worked with other partners to conduct tests and individual surveys of those who have presented with the illness.

    To find the source of the outbreak they will apply a secure, electronic survey of all Custer County, Hydro, Hinton and Lookeba residents. The surveys will be shared with residents through the local Emergency Alert System. These surveys are seeking to find additional illnesses that may not have presented to a healthcare provider, as well as the differences in recent activities between those who have been sick and those that have not. The information collected is secure and will only be used for the purpose of determining a cause of illness.

    Person-to-person spread is rare with these illnesses, rather it is more common to contract these illnesses through consumption of undercooked meat, contaminated raw milk or water and the handling of raw poultry or pork without washing hands or surfaces properly.

    In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever or Campylobacter symptoms such as diarrhea (often bloody), fever, nausea, vomiting, and stomach cramps, report it now. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: oklahoma.gov
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    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Listeria Monocytogenes. As of November 09, 2022, a total of 2 people infected with Listeria monocytogenes have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

    According to CDC, Listeriosis... See More is a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, and Listeria outbreaks are often linked to dairy products and produce.

    Some CDC recommendations to prevent Listeriosis:
    - Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
    - Don’t let juice from hot dogs and lunch meat packages get on other foods, utensils, and food preparation surfaces. For people at higher risk avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats, or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving. Wash hands after handling hot dogs, lunch meats, and deli meats
    - Only consume pasteurized milk and milk products, including soft cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Look for the word “pasteurized” on the label. If in doubt, don’t buy it!
    - Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours.

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: fda.gov
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    CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, the USDA-FSIS, and the FDA are investigating a multistate outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections linked to Deli Meat and Cheese. As of November 9, 2022, 16 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria have been reported from... See More 6 states (CA, IL, MD, MA, NJ and NY). 13 people have been hospitalized, 1 person got sick during their pregnancy, resulting in pregnancy loss, and 1 death has been reported from MD. The investigation is ongoing.

    Information collected so far shows that deli meat and cheese purchased at deli counters in multiple states are the likely sources of this outbreak. It is difficult for investigators to identify a single food as the source of outbreaks linked to deli meats and cheeses. This is because Listeria spreads easily between food and the deli environment and can persist for a long time in deli display cases and on equipment. A contaminated food likely introduced the outbreak strain of Listeria into delis in multiple states. Investigators are working to identify any specific products or delis that may be contaminated with the outbreak strain.

    CDC advises people at higher risk of severe Listeria illness to not eat meat or cheese from any deli counter, unless it is reheated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot.

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: cdc.gov
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    CM
    C.........6
    Got meat and cheese delivered from sprouts sunrise mall have been sick for a couple of days
    Reply 3 weeks ago
    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Litchfield. As of September 28, 2022, a total of 28 people infected with Salmonella Litchfield have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

    Most people infected with... See More Salmonella will begin to develop symptoms 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness, salmonellosis, usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment. Most people with salmonellosis develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal.

    Some FDA recommendations to prevent foodborne Illness at home:
    - Clean, wash hands and surfaces often.
    - Separate raw meats from other foods.
    - Cook to the right temperature.
    - Chill, refrigerate foods promptly.

    In case you are experiencing Salmonella symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: fda.gov
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    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes. As of September 14, 2022, a total of 6 people infected with Listeria monocytogenes have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

    According to CDC, Listeriosis... See More is a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, and Listeria outbreaks are often linked to dairy products and produce. This illness is most likely to sicken pregnant women and their newborns, adults aged 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems. Other people can be infected with Listeria, but they rarely become seriously ill.

    Some CDC recommendations to prevent Listeriosis:

    - Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
    - Don’t let juice from hot dog and lunch meat packages get on other foods, utensils, and food preparation surfaces. For people at higher risk avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats, or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving. Wash hands after handling hot dogs, lunch meats, and deli meats
    - Only consume pasteurized milk and milk products, including soft cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Look for the word “pasteurized” on the label. If in doubt, don’t buy it!
    - Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours.

    In case you are experiencing listeria monocytogenes symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: fda.gov
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    The MCDH is investigating an increase in Campylobacteriosis cases in McHenry County. They have identified 8 cases of Campylobacteriosis between Aug. 17 and Aug. 30, which is 4 times more cases compared to the previous two weeks and 3.33 times more cases in August compared to July.... See More No common source of infection has been identified at this time.

    According to MCDH the best way to prevent a campylobacteriosis infection is to take these precautions:
    - Do not drink raw (unpasteurized) milk or untreated water from lakes, rivers or ponds
    - Practice good hand hygiene, especially when handling puppies or kittens with diarrhea
    - Wash hands before, during and after preparing food
    - Cook all raw meats to proper temperature
    - Use soap and hot water to wash cutting boards, counters or utensils used to prepare raw poultry, seafood or meat to prevent cross contamination with other foods
    - Avoid handling food, caring for others, patient care or daycare work if symptomatic.

    In case you experience Campylobacter symptoms such as diarrhea (often bloody), fever, nausea, vomiting, and stomach cramps, report it now. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: mchenrycountyil.gov
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    The FDA is currently investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Mississippi. As of August 31, 2022, a total of 99 people infected with Salmonella Mississippi have been reported. No specific product has been linked to this investigation as of today. This investigation is ongoing.

    Most people infected with... See More Salmonella will begin to develop symptoms 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness, salmonellosis, usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment. Most people with salmonellosis develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal.

    Some FDA recommendations to prevent foodborne Illness at home:
    - Clean, wash hands and surfaces often.
    - Separate raw meats from other foods.
    - Cook to the right temperature.
    - Chill, refrigerate foods promptly.

    In case you are experiencing Salmonella symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: fda.gov
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    Update August 29, 2022

    As of August 29, 2022, a total of 7 people infected with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) and 1 probable case have been reported in King County. 6 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. Currently, all of the cases are among... See More people from East African communities. All but one of the cases had illness onsets from June 20-August 17, 2022. One additional person was identified by WGS with an onset in December 2021. All people have recovered, or are currently recovering. The investigation into the source of these infections is still ongoing.

    Source: Seattle & King County Public Health

    August 23, 2022

    Seattle & King County Public Health announced that they are investigating a new outbreak of 7 people infected with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) in King County. Currently, all 7 of the ill people are from East African communities. 6 of the 7 people had illness onsets from June 20-August 1, 2022. 1 additional person was identified by WGS with an onset in December 2021. 4 people have been hospitalized; this includes 3 children who developed a type of kidney complication called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). 6 people have recovered, and 1 is currently recovering.

    Most of the ill people have reported eating multiple types of meat, including goat and ground beef, during their exposure period but the Public Health cannot rule out other possible sources at this time. Genetic fingerprinting results (whole genome sequencing) indicate that all 7 ill people have the same genetic strain meaning they likely have a common source of infection. At this time, this outbreak does not appear to be related to a multistate outbreak initially found in at least 4 different states CDC reported. The investigation is ongoing.

    Raw meats like ground beef, goat, and lamb sometimes have germs like STEC, and have been associated with outbreaks in the past. Public Health advises following these 4 food safety steps to prevent getting sick from STEC.
    - Clean: Wash your hands, utensils, and surfaces often. Rinse fruits and vegetables under running water before eating, cutting, or peeling.
    - Separate: Keep food that won’t be cooked separate from raw meat, poultry, and seafood.
    - Cook: Use a food thermometer to make sure you have cooked your food to a temperature high enough to kill germs.
    - Chill: Refrigerate perishable food (food that goes bad) within 2 hours. If the food is exposed to temperatures above 90°F (like a hot car or picnic), refrigerate within 1 hour. Thaw food in the refrigerator, not on the counter.

    In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: kingcounty.gov  | Symptoms: Diarrhea, Nausea, Cramps, Bloody Stool
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    Update October 04, 2022

    CDC announced that this outbreak is over, as of October 04, 2022. More than 80% of sick people who were interviewed by public health officials reported eating at Wendy’s restaurants in several states before getting sick. Many of them ate burgers and sandwiches... See More with romaine lettuce, but the specific ingredient that caused the outbreak could not be confirmed.

    As of October 4, 2022, a total of 109 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 were reported from 6 states (IN, KY, MI, NY, OH and PA). 52 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. Illnesses started on dates ranging from July 26, 2022, to August 17, 2022.

    Source: CDC

    Update September 1, 2022

    As of August 31, 2022, a total of 97 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported to CDC from 6 states (IN, KY, MI, NY, OH and PA). 43 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. Illnesses started on dates ranging from July 26, 2022, to August 15, 2022. A specific food has not yet been confirmed as the source of this outbreak, but many sick people reported eating burgers and sandwiches with romaine lettuce at Wendy’s restaurants before getting sick. The investigation is ongoing.

    Source: CDC

    Update August 25, 2022

    As of August 25, 2022, a total of 84 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported to CDC from 4 states (IN, MI, OH and PA). 38 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. illnesses started on dates ranging from July 26, 2022, to August 9, 2022. A specific food has not yet been confirmed as the source of this outbreak, but many sick people reported eating burgers and sandwiches with romaine lettuce at Wendy’s restaurants before getting sick. The investigation is ongoing.

    Source: CDC

    Update August 19, 2022

    As of August 18, 2022, a total of 37 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported to CDC from 4 states (IN, MI, OH and PA). 10 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. illnesses started on dates ranging from July 26, 2022, to August 8, 2022.

    A specific food has not yet been confirmed as the source of this outbreak, but many sick people reported eating sandwiches with romaine lettuce at Wendy’s restaurants in Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania before getting sick. Based on this information, Wendy’s is taking the precautionary measure of removing the romaine lettuce being used in sandwiches from restaurants in that region. Wendy’s uses a different type of romaine lettuce for salads. Investigators are working to confirm whether romaine lettuce is the source of this outbreak and whether romaine lettuce used in Wendy’s sandwiches was served or sold at other businesses. The investigation is ongoing.

    Source: CDC

    August 17, 2022

    CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, the FDA, and the USDA-FSIS are collecting different types of data to identify the food source of a multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections. So far, illnesses have only been reported from Michigan and Ohio. A single food has not yet been identified as the source and this investigation is ongoing.

    Michigan and Ohio have both reported large increases in the number of E. coli infections in their states. As of August 16, 2022, a total of 29 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported to CDC from 2 states (MI and OH). 9 people were hospitalized and no deaths were reported. Illnesses started on dates ranging from July 26, 2022, to August 6, 2022

    To prevent getting sick from E. coli, CDC advises following these 4 steps when handling or preparing food: clean, separate, cook, and chill.
    - Clean: Wash your hands, utensils, and surfaces often. Rinse fruits and vegetables under running water before eating, cutting, or peeling.
    - Separate: Keep food that won’t be cooked separate from raw meat, poultry, and seafood.
    - Cook: Use a food thermometer to make sure you have cooked your food to a temperature high enough to kill germs.
    - Chill: Refrigerate perishable food (food that goes bad) within 2 hours. If the food is exposed to temperatures above 90°F (like a hot car or picnic), refrigerate within 1 hour. Thaw food in the refrigerator, not on the counter.

    In case you are experiencing E. coli symptoms such as watery diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting; stomach cramps; and mild fever, it is important to report it. It can help to detect & resolve outbreaks early and prevent others from being harmed, and it enables better surveillance. If symptoms persist, seek medical care.

    Source: cdc.gov
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    QJ
    anonymous6554
    Hell no!
    Reply 3 months ago
    PI
    p.................n
    i got it and im in texas
    Reply 3 months ago
    BM
    anonymous6566
    Thank you for sharing
    Reply 3 months ago
    TI
    t..........a
    I ate at Wendy's I live in Albuquerque New Mexico I didn't have any lettuce though I ate a baked potato it made me so sick for 2 weeks I thought I had a stomach bug until I realize the report about Wendy's I don't know if the baked potato has anything to do with it but it made me sick
    -1 Reply 3 months ago
    Last 30 days